Study – Creators Frustrated with DMCA (with Pandas!)

The evidence is increasingly clear: The DMCA needs work.

Also, here to help explain are some panda gifs.

A new study by the Copyright Alliance shows that creators have frustrations with the Digital Millennial Copyright Act (DMCA) system for dealing with copyright infringement on the internet.

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The Copyright Alliance surveyed 1,362 creators about their experience with the DMCA. Some of the most interesting results are:

  • 52.2% of creators monitor the internet for infringement in some way.
  • 37.4% do not monitor for infringement.
  • Yet (and this is important) only 2.5% say they do not mind if their work is used online without permission.

There is an obvious gap between 2.5% who are happy to give their work away and 37.4% who may not be happy to give it away but don’t monitor for infringement. The study suggests an explanation: Creators lack information on how the DMCA works or perhaps it’s too difficult and time consuming to merit the time.

There are lots of other interesting findings in the study – you should read it – but the other key finding is that 47.6% of respondents say that the DMCA is ineffective. That’s a pretty high level of dissatisfaction with a system that was supposed to safeguard creators’ rights. Not quite a panda-playing-in-the-snow level of happiness.

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This study dovetails with one I worked on with the Arts and Entertainment Advocacy Clinic at my law school, George Mason Law (where I’m a 3L and ready to graduate!). In that study, student lawyers took on the role of monitoring and reporting infringement online for several works.

Probably the most shocking finding of our many hours searching for and responding to infringement is the astounding level of malicious schemes masquerading as sites to download these works. In other words, bad guys dangle the lure of a download to steal personal information, credit cards, or to install malware on computer of the consumer. Many times, in fact, the promised download was not even on the site, something one discovered only after clicking through endless screens and downloading who knows what software.

47% of the sites purporting to offer the work were instead malicious in some way.

It’s a dangerous world out there.

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With this added dimension in the mix, we were able to confirm removal of only 16% of infringing content from the internet using the DMCA.

You can read the George Mason Law study here.

The studies show the DMCA is not working as it should, especially for individual creators just trying to make a living off their art. More research is needed, but even more, the DMCA needs updates. The pandas, though, are fine.

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Three Cheers for Fair Use From a Movie Critic

Hooray for the fair use doctrine! As a movie critic, I rely on it the way Hollywood relies on comic book sequels: Constantly and without shame.

Copyright keeps the ownership of a movie with the people who made it, allowing them to control where it’s shown and profit from it. Fair use protects my right to call the movie an indulgent, narcissistic journey through the director’s surprisingly uninteresting psyche.

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Everybody wins.

The movie critic gig works like this: I get invited to screen a movie, either through a big PR firm (most big studios), a smaller PR firm (most indie movies), or direct invitation of the moviemaker (very tiny indie movies with no promotion budget).  I then see the movie, usually in a theater but sometimes via DVD at home. Sometimes the PR folks will pitch an interview with someone involved in the making of the movie, a director (usually fascinating), a writer (also fascinating), or an actor (often far less fascinating).

Then I write.

Usually a review is straightforward:  a dismal reflection on the state of the arts in America today or (more rarely) a blissful ode to joy and all that is wonderful. The structure usually includes a basic reaction with a brief description of the plot and characters, an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of the movie, a bit of warning about content for parents to consider, and a general endorsement or lack thereof. Sometimes, however, the movie critic muse strikes and one writes a review in the voice of a character or from an alternative universe, something along those lines.

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When the review is published, whether online or in print, it is often accompanied by a photo or two,  or often with a movie clip. When the review is on camera, either on TV or online, it will often include clips of scenes from the movie or the trailer.

The people promoting a movie usually make photos and video available for use by critics. They essentially grant a free license to use the materials with certain limitations, often that the material be used for criticism, that it not be sold commercially, and that the material be attributed to them. Fancy outlets will sometimes alter the photos to fit a certain visual theme. Most of us hardscrabble critics don’t have the staff or time for that. Almost all on camera reviews edit the video to fit with the spoken part of the reviews.

All that’s left is to upload the link to Rotten Tomatoes and respond to the anonymous internet folk calling you a know-nothing idiot or a bought-off hack (if only..still waiting for that cash to flow in).

The big studios are very professional about bad reviews. They generally knew when they had a stinker, although they won’t admit it. I guess they figure if you don’t like Captain America VIII, Captain America IX will be along soon enough.

But sometimes you review a film into which some poor dear has poured all her passion and energy, not to mention money. Passion + energy + money sometimes makes a good film, but you need talent in the mix too. Every once in a while, a filmmaker will threaten legal action because they are not happy with the review you wrote. Defamation is a big threat, and copyright infringement sometimes enters too.

That’s when it’s great to point out (or have the lawyers point out) a little thing called the First Amendment and its little sister, the Fair Use defense.

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What the doctrine does not allow me to do is to use the characters or images in my own work that is not criticism or parody. I can’t make a better indulgent, narcissistic journey through a boring psyche using the same characters or plot. Believe me, there are plenty of boring psyches to go around, anyway. I can’t sell t-shirts with a screenshot of the movie on them. And I certainly can’t bootleg the movie to show friends how bad it is.

In other words, I can point out that the filmmaker made a movie that sucks, but I can’t take actions to substitute my product for theirs. It’s not a hard distinction in the movie critic world and it should not be in other areas as well.

So here’s to Fair Use, keeping everyone in their lanes and balancing the interests of ownership with the interests of speech.

Calling All Creatives – Copyright Monkey Business in DC

While you’re busy actually creating the works of art that edify our culture and put food on your table, there’s monkey business going on in Washington, DC. Survey Monkey business, that is.

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This drama is over at the Copyright Office. The place you depend on to register your works and promote your right to own and control your work.

Back in October, the Librarian of Congress removed Maria Pallante, the Register of Copyrights, from her position. Pallante was generally regarded by the creative community as understanding the needs of creators and being an advocate for them. Her removal  happened suddenly and with a lot of confusion. No one is really sure why or what that means for copyright policy. Best case scenario, someone good is appointed. Worst case, the people  who want to use all the work of the creative community – for free – end up inserting their pick.

What do I do, you ask? Well the Librarian of Congress has taken the odd step of posting a Survey Monkey survey online to solicit responses about what the public would like the next Register to be like.

You can find it here.  It will only take a minute or two to fill it out.

 

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It’s an oddly vague survey, but here are some suggestions on what would be beneficial. We need someone who understands and appreciates the work and passion the creative community puts into their work. Someone who knows how hard it is to make it as a creative and is concerned when people take advantage of them by pirating their work. Someone who is forward thinking and sees the need for the Copyright Office to have updated technology (the system is incredibly outdated, as you know if you ever have tried to use the website to register your work). Someone who understands property rights, that if you create something you should benefit from it. That kind of person.

Often with online surveys in this contested area of policy, we see a lot of responses from the tech community, who tend to want everything to be free to everyone. Taking a minute to respond will keep them from drowning out creatives.

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More information here and here.

Photo used under a creative commons license by Alexandre Darth 

Katherine Lents Finds Her Creativity Spark – Creator Profile

Sometimes a big risk is necessary to find the spark in life.

That’s what Texas filmmaker and entrepreneur Katherine Lents found when she left a stable and steady job in the pharmaceutical industry. She liked the work, but it didn’t feed her passion. So she founded ShowUp Media, a new web platform which aims to be a secure showcase for video content. Hosting  web series, short films, and TV pilots, ShowUp connects filmmakers with viewers directly, creating a better experience for both consumers of shows and the filmmakers who make them.

In addition to creating a platform featuring the work of other filmmakers, Lents seized the opportunity to produce work of her own, a process she embraces.

“I love the collaborative nature of filmmaking,” she told me, “It starts with something as simple as a script but takes the interpretation of your director, actors, crew, everyone right down to the production assistant.”

“It’s something that feeds that creativity spark.”

Lents hopes that attention to creativity and to the filmmakers who channel it will set ShowUp Media apart from its enormous competitor, YouTube. The huge platform poses a couple of problems for filmmakers. First, she says, viewers have to wade through an endless stream of cat videos and fractured content to get to things they want to watch. Creators end up losing the opportunity to build their brand with so much static in the way.

Secondly, it’s relatively easy for users to pull down the video content using readily available software and repost it at will. This piracy erodes both the filmmaker’s brand and revenue.

Combatting piracy is a huge motivating factor for ShowUp. Together with a tech company called Notion Theory, Lents has developed a platform that takes into account piracy concerns. Constantly adapting as piracy software emerges, ShowUp will ensure that the filmmakers get the benefit of users’ views, not some infringer in Russia. She hopes that creating a secure site will allow filmmakers to focus on what is most important: Creating their art and finding an audience for it.

Preserving copyright is extremely important in this context. A space where filmmakers feel confident will draw good content. If they control and profit from their work rather than being at the mercy of a world of infringers, Lents hopes the site will thrive. As filmmakers present quality product and viewers find content they like, the effect will multiply. Protecting copyright directly effects ShowUp’s bottom line.

She hopes to host content exclusively and have the site operate not only as a platform for consumer viewing but as a broker for larger deals and bigger distribution.

But that’s not the only goal. Ultimately, Lents wants the copyright and business to fade into the background so that the art can shine.

“The goal is to get viewers and filmmakers to work together,” says Lents. To that end, viewers can up vote videos they like and even weigh in on what pilots they think should be made into full series.

In a full-circle kind of happening, content from ShowUp may find its way back to the small screen. Lents is in talks with local cable companies to broadcast ShowUp’s content to TVs in the Austin area. This would get even more eyeballs on the filmmakers’ work and more oomph for their brands.

Katherine’s big leap is just one way that innovation and free market competition works in conjunction with copyright to serve everyone – both the creators and viewers win. Good luck!

You can follow Lents on Twitter @KatherineLents (she loves lamp) and ShowUp @ShowUpMedia

IMG_4988About the Author: Rebecca Cusey is a writer and law student. She writes about movies and other things as a Senior Contributor for The Federalist and as a Policy Fellow at the American Conservative Union. She studies law at Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason as a third-year student focusing on Intellectual Property. She lives near Washington, DC with her adorable husband and dashing children. 

Follow Rebecca on Twitter: @Rebecca_Cusey

SONA Fights On Against Government Overreach After Judge’s Smackdown on DOJ Over Music Licensing

Last week, federal Judge Louis Stanton delivered a smack-down on the Department of Justice (read the order here) but a suit brought by songwriters is waiting in the wings.

In a declaratory judgment, Judge Stanton sided with BMI and rejected DOJ’s proposed rule change forcing vast changes in the way copyright owners license and get paid for their work. The DOJ rule mandated a change from fractional licensing to 100% licensing. In case there was any doubt about Judge Stanton’s ruling, the opinion ends with an epic, unequivocal statement: “The Consent Decree neither bars fractional licensing nor requires full-work licensing.”

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Fractional licensing works like this: Bars, stadiums and online streaming services, among other outlets, buy licenses from organizations like BMI and ASCAP (called in the industry PROs) to be able to play a list of songs licensed to the PRO. So if you’re in a smoky bar and hear “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes,” it’s because ASCAP or BMI represents someone who owns at least a part of the copyright to the song. BMI collects from the bar the fee for the portion of the song that their member owns and passes that along to the member. You get to feel melancholy on a Friday night, the bar makes another drink sale, the artist gets paid for his work, and everyone is happy.

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The DOJ rule change would have altered this arrangement, which has been the industry practice for a long time, so that any one copyright owner can license the song at 100% of its value to one PRO and another owner could license at 100% to a different PRO. Then someone, maybe the copyright owners, have to get the percentages of fees to the other owners.

When songs have not just a few but dozens of copyright owners, you can imagine the mess. Copyright owners worry this would cause a confusion, an increase in overhead as all these payments are figured out, and decrease their negotiating power, resulting in lower revenue overall as the values of the licenses plummet.

The basic problem is more fundamental. Over decades of music creation, songwriters, performing artists, labels, and distributors like PROs have negotiated and signed contracts between themselves that govern these things. They contracted based on an understanding of how the system would work, and tightly negotiated those contracts with fractional licensing in mind. The DOJ rule would have overturned thousands, nay millions, of private contracts between parties who bargained for exactly what they wanted.

Government doesn’t get to do that.

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Plus, when songwriters collaborate now, they don’t have to stop and think about PRO affiliation. They just pick the best collaborator to get the job done. If the DOJ’s rule is implemented, songwriters would have to consider with which PRO a collaborator has signed. If government action limits who artists can work with, not only is that a ridiculous intrusion into private contracting, but will end up creating a less vibrant music universe for listeners. Bad for artists, bad for society.

Freedom to contract is the premise behind another lawsuit on the matter, filed by the grass-roots organization Songwriters of North America (SONA). While the BMI lawsuit was based on asking the court to interpret the consent decree that governs BMI and ASCAP licensing agreements, the SONA lawsuit has a completely different legal theory. (You can read the SONA complaint here.)

Despite the assertions of Public Knowledge, neither count in SONA’s lawsuit is a copyright claim. Instead, the first puts forth a Fifth Amendment claim that DOJ’s proposed actions would take property from affected parties without due process. People have a property interest in both the contracts that the rule change would overturn and the underlying copyright interests. The Fifth Amendment protects against government taking these interests with the flick of pen.

The second count is an administrative law claim, that the DOJ rule change violated the APA (Administrative Procedure Act) by acting outside of the scope of the DOJ’s authority and was adopted without procedural safeguards, among other things. SONA is asking the court to declare the rule change unconstitutional under the Fifth Amendment and unlawful under the APA.

At this point, it’s not clear whether the DOJ will fight back against Judge Stanton’s appeal or let the matter stand. If the DOJ rule change is thrown out because of Judge Stanton’s reading of the consent decree, the SONA suit may well be moot. But if the case continues, SONA has a very good case against government overreach.

IMG_4988About the Author: Rebecca Cusey is a writer and law student. She writes about movies and other things as a Senior Contributor for The Federalist and as a Policy Fellow at the American Conservative Union. She studies law at Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason as a third-year student focusing on Intellectual Property. She lives near Washington, DC with her adorable husband and dashing children. 

Follow Rebecca on Twitter: @Rebecca_Cusey

4 Reasons Conservatives Should Care About Strong Copyright Law

Ain’t nobody agreeing on policy these days. Heck, we don’t even agree with our own parties,  Democrats fighting Democrats and Republicans fighting Republicans all day long. Besides agreeing that Simone Biles is amazing, it seems Americans don’t have much to agree on.

Except copyright. People in red states, people in blue states, even people in red states turning blue, can agree that protecting creators’ ability to control and profit from their work benefits us all.

I’m a conservative myself. So, for my fellow right of center folks, here are reasons conservatives should care about protecting copyright.

Strong Intellectual Property Laws Encourage Innovation

America brought the world the automobile, rock n roll, and the desktop computer. We did it because we are a dynamic people, always looking for how we can improve the world. But not just that. People innovate because they think they see a spot in the market they can fill and make a buck, maybe a lot of bucks!

It’s all about incentives. Copyright protects the potential to profit off your innovation (as do copyright’s cousin – patents). If you do not think there is a chance you will make money, why invest time and effort writing a song or your great novel? How can anyone but the very rich invest decades mastering, say, an electric guitar if they won’t be able to support their families playing it? In fact, if copyright does not protect you, the incentive is to choose something safe to put food on the table rather than risk innovating.

Copyright protection promises that if your novel hits it big, like Harry Potter big, you will get the benefit of that success. It gives you a financial incentive to shoot for the stars.

People Should Benefit From Their Hard Work

Hard work leads to rewards. Those who don’t work hard do not deserve to get big rewards. This is a conservative mantra. We love scrappy small businesses who build something out of nothing. We love big corporations who employ millions (so long as they play by fair rules).

But what if your hard work is in making a film? Writing cookbooks? Composing songs to sing at church? Sometimes conservative circles do not see these types of innovations as deserving. After all, a girl messing around on the piano is hardly hauling hay for the afternoon feeding of the cattle. An author tapping away at Starbucks is hardly building a new skyscraper.

This is faulty thinking. If someone works hard, whether it be with brains or brawn, they deserve to benefit from that hard work. It takes decades, not to mention talent, to become a professional musician. It takes months of painful labor to write a book. An author is a businessman as much as a farmer and deserves to profit from his work. Conservatives don’t think there’s anything wrong with making an honest buck. Conservatives should be encouraging that in the creative arena as well as in the physical.

People Should Pay For Benefits They Receive

There’s nothing wrong with making an honest buck, but there is something wrong with freeloading. This is why conservatives oppose excessive entitlements, creeping socialism, and lawlessness. Stealing in any form undermines a society. It not only hurts the producers, but erodes the soul of the person freeloading. There is dignity in paying for what you want and need, even if that sometimes means you go without, but very little in accepting endless handouts.

Conservatives believe this strongly, except when it comes to the Internet and copyright infringement. People who would never take a welfare check do not balk at downloading a pirated movie. People who would never steal a paperclip from work don’t think twice about listening to unlicensed music.

It’s easy. It seems small. And it’s wrong. Stealing is stealing in any context. The true conservative value is that people should pay for any benefit they receive, the market should work freely, and stealing should be stopped. The Internet should be no exception. Strong copyright laws protect that value.

Copyright is in the Constitution

Article I, Section 8, Clause 8 empowers Congress to “To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.”

Conservatives are all about sticking to the Constitution. The Founding Fathers thought Copyright was important enough to specifically mention in the Constitution. They knew that protecting innovation would lead to a strong country. And they were right. Times may have changed, but the basic principles by which we live remain the same.

Take Action

Go ahead and speak up. The Copyright Alliance has posted an open letter to all 2016 Political Candidates, asking them to promote strong copyright laws. An easy way to support strong copyright is to go here and add your name to the petition.

IMG_4988About the Author: Rebecca Cusey is a writer and law student. She writes about movies and other things as a Senior Contributor for The Federalist and as a Policy Fellow at the American Conservative Union. She studies law at Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason as a third-year student focusing on Intellectual Property. She lives near Washington, DC with her adorable husband and dashing children. 

header photo credit: Photo4Jenifer under a creative commons license.

Bad Things Happen When You Break the Law – Copyright Edition

People can be stupid, you know? Like this guy who called cops whining that the dude he was going to buy drugs from robbed him instead. Or this chick who felt like she got shorted in a drug deal and called the cops to make sure she got her fair share of pot. Or this genius who called the cops to get the $10 in change his meth dealer owed him. Turns out the “meth” was salt, to boot!

When you step outside the law, things outside the law happen to you, things like getting beat up, robbed, or sold salt instead of the high-grade methamphetamine you contracted to purchase.

It’s no different online, although you might lose more than $10 in the process. If you go to download stolen movies or music off illegal sites online, it’s likely that bad guys are waiting in the shadows to sock you over your metaphorical head.

A just-released study by the Digital Citizens Alliance  reports that 1 in 3 piracy sites expose users to malware or identity theft. Malware is bad software downloaded onto your computer. It can do several things: Monitor your activities, steal bank and credit card information, even activate your camera so someone can watch you without your knowledge. With the personal information malware can harvest, criminals online can sell your identity to the highest bidder. Plus, there’s a relatively new game in town in which hackers lock your computer and won’t unlock it until you pay a ransom. This can cost $500 for an individual, or more!

And that’s not even getting into the popups on these criminal sites that trick people into revealing personal usernames and passwords.

The DCA points out that although these criminals tend to be based overseas, they are aided by American companies that make it easy for them to operate in American Internet space without law enforcement being able to track who they are or where they are based. Companies like CloudFlare and HawkHost mask the illegal site’s DNS and hosting information. The criminals hide behind these American companies much as a drug deal hides behind the kid down the street who tells him when the cops are coming.

Human nature doesn’t change. Bad things happen when unsuspecting dupes wander into dark alleys. They take the risk thinking they’re just breaking a little law – whether it be buying some weed or downloading the latest blockbuster – but criminals have bigger plans.

Image: crodriguesc with a creative commons license.

All the Legal Stuff About Donald Trump using Queen’s “We Are the Champions” You Didn’t Want to Know

The iconic rock band Queen doesn’t like Donald Trump. Sadly for Queen, he likes them.

Is This the Real Life? Is This Just Fantasy?

Trump used their super famous song “We are the Champions” to walk onstage at the Republican National Convention.

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Bombastic and crass in a particularly Trumpian, 80s wanna be cool way? Sure. Illegal? Probably not.

Queen responded (like your grandma who always signs her Facebook posts “-Grandma”) with:

This isn’t the first time. Maybe he’s just a poor boy, he needs no sympathy, but a month ago, Queen’s Brian May blogged about his anger that Trump uses his songs.

Buddy You’re a Boy Make a Big Noise

As far as permission to use the song goes, Queen got blood on its face, huge disgrace. According to Sean Spicer, a big honcho at the RNC, they got a license.

Campaigns, like other big events, buy licenses from organizations that maintain an extensive roster of famous songs. The organization lists songs by its members, the owners of the copyrights on the music. The organization then collects the licensing fee, passes that along to the copyright owners, and enforces licensing violations on behalf of the copyright owners. Easy peasy. The system works quietly behind the scenes and everyone is happy, or at least not unhappy enough to complain much. ASCAP and BMI are the two big players in this country. Sure enough, “We are the Champions” is licensed by BMI, charmingly to someone named “Mercury Frederick.”  It’s always good to confirm things that should be route with the Trump campaign, but I think we can safely assume by BMI’s silence that some responsible party at the RNC did, indeed, license the music. If so, Trump is not in violation of the copyright.

God Knows, God Knows I Want to Break Free

Even if the campaign did not buy a license, whether or not the use of the song would fall into the “Fair Use” exception is open to debate.

Fair Use is a defense to copyright violations. Basically, if someone sues a person for using their song, when that case gets to court, the person being sued will say “Yes, I used the song, yes it belongs to this other person, but it’s ok because it’s fair use.” And if the judge or jury agrees, another copyright case bites the dust.

America has broad fair use standards in comparison to much of the world because America values free speech to the extent of stepping on the toes of copyright owners. This has only gotten stronger in recent years, with the Internet being the Wild Wild West of copyright infringement under the banner of fair use, but I digress.

Judges look at four factors when considering fair use: 1) the purpose and character of the use, 2) the nature of the copyrighted work, 3) the amount and substantiality of the portion taken, and 4) the effect of the use upon the potential market.

Because campaigns are (at least until Trump) shy about negative publicity, these factors haven’t been fully tested in court in the context of political campaigns, but they likely weigh in favor of use of snippets of songs by a campaign. First, the nature of the use is political speech, which is the type of speech passionately protected by First Amendment caselaw. Secondly, the campaigns tend to use just portions of the songs for the walk on. Nobody wants to sit through all five minutes of “We are the Champions” before listening to Trump blather, I mean, speak. So the entire song is not used, which is a big factor. Finally, it would be hard to argue that using a portion of a song in a campaign somehow cuts into the sales of the song, which is another big factor.

Pressure Pushing Down on Me, Pressing Down on You

Probably the real problem to Brian May and the rest of Queen is the very notion of being associated with someone like Trump. They’re in the terror of knowing what [Trump] is about, watching some good friends screaming “Let me out.”

This is more of a trademark issue than a copyright issue. There are fancy legal terms associated like “Lanham Act” and “Right of Publicity,” but the basic crux of the issue is whether or not the use of the song would trick people into thinking the band supports the candidate. Think of it in terms of purses. If I stick a Gucci label on a knock-off purse, I’m violating the trademark because a purchaser will think that purse came from Gucci. (Or if they bought it on a street corner in New York, they won’t think so but maybe their friends will.) I’m basically stealing the good name of Gucci and using it to my own ends.

For a band or celebrity to sue under this theory requires them to convince a jury or judge that the people listening in the crowd were confused into thinking that Queen endorses Trump. That seems like a long shot in this context, don’t you think?

Carry On, Carry On As if Nothing Really Matters

An interesting wrinkle (interesting at least to copyright nerds) is that Queen is a British band. Just as copyright law in America tends to bend in the direction of encouraging free speech, copyright law in England has a slightly different flavor. They have something called moral rights, which do not exist here. This concept gives the copyright holder much greater control over the association of their work, protecting the reputation and person of the copyright holder. This includes the right to be credited when the work is used and the right to object to derogatory treatment, distortion, or mutilation of the work.

Queen would probably feel that Trump’s use of a portion of their song is mutilation of their song.

I am not a scholar of British law, so I do not know if these laws would apply to Trump’s use of Queen’s songs were they occurring in the UK, but I’m sure the thinking informs the background of Brian May’s objections.

 

Apple Patents Super Mega On the Fly Copyright Infringement Blocker

Ok. That’s not what they call it. But that is essentially what it is.

Apple patented technology that allows venue owners to use an infrared device that would interact with the iPhone camera and stop people from recording or taking photos.

It’s easy to see who would want this. Adele, that’s who. She seems like she would be the first in line to stop people from bootlegging her concerts.

Instead of using the DMCA to police YouTube, Vimeo, and such sites after the fact, this would enable Adele to belt out “Hello” and block it from being recorded at the outset.

With the rise of live streaming apps like Periscope, you could see how a copyright owner would want this even more. These apps make it possible for someone – anyone – to livestream a concert to thousands who didn’t bother to buy a ticket. This technology could conceivably stop that.

There are serious concerns, though. It’s not hard to imagine situations where such technology would be used on behalf of the dark side. Blocking the bootlegging of copyrighted music or video is one thing. Blocking phones from recording a protest is another. And it’s not hard to imagine police departments having mobile infrared devices to stop people from recording encounters with citizens. That’s just in the United States. Putin would probably put one on every street corner in Russia.

The second issue, of course, is safety. The same device that blocks us from live streaming that Led Zeppelin tribute band would also block concert goers from sending photos and video to police should a catastrophe or terrorist attack happen. And what about apps that use the camera, like barcode scanners or translators?

Finally, and I suspect Apple knows this deep inside their little hearts, blocking the camera would be a sure way to get droves of people to buy Droids. In order for this technology to work, it would have to be universal. The only way to make it universal would be to pass a law requiring all cell phones to have the technology.

Some of these issues could be solved with legislation and/or court cases, in the ongoing march of technology and free speech.

It’s an intriguing idea, one that probably pleases copyright owners from Lin-Manuel Miranda on Broadway to Taylor Swift playing the Hollywood Bowl. Protecting your work at the outset makes sense instead of playing whack a mole after the fact, but we’ll see if it sees the light of day or languishes at the PTO with Apple’s other red headed stepchild patents.

Read more, including Forbes raising the issue of securing secret places from spies with this technology.

Photo: Manel Torralba/Flickr Creative Commons