4 Reasons Conservatives Should Care About Strong Copyright Law

Ain’t nobody agreeing on policy these days. Heck, we don’t even agree with our own parties,  Democrats fighting Democrats and Republicans fighting Republicans all day long. Besides agreeing that Simone Biles is amazing, it seems Americans don’t have much to agree on.

Except copyright. People in red states, people in blue states, even people in red states turning blue, can agree that protecting creators’ ability to control and profit from their work benefits us all.

I’m a conservative myself. So, for my fellow right of center folks, here are reasons conservatives should care about protecting copyright.

Strong Intellectual Property Laws Encourage Innovation

America brought the world the automobile, rock n roll, and the desktop computer. We did it because we are a dynamic people, always looking for how we can improve the world. But not just that. People innovate because they think they see a spot in the market they can fill and make a buck, maybe a lot of bucks!

It’s all about incentives. Copyright protects the potential to profit off your innovation (as do copyright’s cousin – patents). If you do not think there is a chance you will make money, why invest time and effort writing a song or your great novel? How can anyone but the very rich invest decades mastering, say, an electric guitar if they won’t be able to support their families playing it? In fact, if copyright does not protect you, the incentive is to choose something safe to put food on the table rather than risk innovating.

Copyright protection promises that if your novel hits it big, like Harry Potter big, you will get the benefit of that success. It gives you a financial incentive to shoot for the stars.

People Should Benefit From Their Hard Work

Hard work leads to rewards. Those who don’t work hard do not deserve to get big rewards. This is a conservative mantra. We love scrappy small businesses who build something out of nothing. We love big corporations who employ millions (so long as they play by fair rules).

But what if your hard work is in making a film? Writing cookbooks? Composing songs to sing at church? Sometimes conservative circles do not see these types of innovations as deserving. After all, a girl messing around on the piano is hardly hauling hay for the afternoon feeding of the cattle. An author tapping away at Starbucks is hardly building a new skyscraper.

This is faulty thinking. If someone works hard, whether it be with brains or brawn, they deserve to benefit from that hard work. It takes decades, not to mention talent, to become a professional musician. It takes months of painful labor to write a book. An author is a businessman as much as a farmer and deserves to profit from his work. Conservatives don’t think there’s anything wrong with making an honest buck. Conservatives should be encouraging that in the creative arena as well as in the physical.

People Should Pay For Benefits They Receive

There’s nothing wrong with making an honest buck, but there is something wrong with freeloading. This is why conservatives oppose excessive entitlements, creeping socialism, and lawlessness. Stealing in any form undermines a society. It not only hurts the producers, but erodes the soul of the person freeloading. There is dignity in paying for what you want and need, even if that sometimes means you go without, but very little in accepting endless handouts.

Conservatives believe this strongly, except when it comes to the Internet and copyright infringement. People who would never take a welfare check do not balk at downloading a pirated movie. People who would never steal a paperclip from work don’t think twice about listening to unlicensed music.

It’s easy. It seems small. And it’s wrong. Stealing is stealing in any context. The true conservative value is that people should pay for any benefit they receive, the market should work freely, and stealing should be stopped. The Internet should be no exception. Strong copyright laws protect that value.

Copyright is in the Constitution

Article I, Section 8, Clause 8 empowers Congress to “To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.”

Conservatives are all about sticking to the Constitution. The Founding Fathers thought Copyright was important enough to specifically mention in the Constitution. They knew that protecting innovation would lead to a strong country. And they were right. Times may have changed, but the basic principles by which we live remain the same.

Take Action

Go ahead and speak up. The Copyright Alliance has posted an open letter to all 2016 Political Candidates, asking them to promote strong copyright laws. An easy way to support strong copyright is to go here and add your name to the petition.

IMG_4988About the Author: Rebecca Cusey is a writer and law student. She writes about movies and other things as a Senior Contributor for The Federalist and as a Policy Fellow at the American Conservative Union. She studies law at Antonin Scalia Law School at George Mason as a third-year student focusing on Intellectual Property. She lives near Washington, DC with her adorable husband and dashing children. 

header photo credit: Photo4Jenifer under a creative commons license.